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“I think perfection is ugly.
Somewhere in the things humans make, I want to see scars, failure, disorder, distortion.”

― Yohji Yamamoto


Inside the Great Nebula in Orion

Inside the Great Nebula in Orion



















NGC2237 Rosette Nebula Sii/Ha/Oiii (by floppypaws)

NGC2237 Rosette Nebula Sii/Ha/Oiii (by floppypaws)



















Hubble Sees Pinwheel of Star Birth (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

Hubble Sees Pinwheel of Star Birth (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)





















  1. This image of a pair of interacting galaxies called Arp 273 was released to celebrate the 21st anniversary of the launch of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The distorted shape of the larger of the two galaxies shows signs of tidal interactions with the smaller of the two. It is thought that the smaller galaxy has actually passed through the larger one.

  2. This new Hubble image - One among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory - shows gives the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble’s WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

Credit: NASA, ESA and Allison Loll/Jeff Hester (Arizona State University). Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble) - (via)

















one of a few recent experiments. (by colerise)

one of a few recent experiments. (by colerise)



















Milky Way Over Longs Peak (by gainesp2003)

Milky Way Over Longs Peak (by gainesp2003)



















Helix Nebula-Narrowband in Aquarius (by mpastro2001)

Helix Nebula-Narrowband in Aquarius (by mpastro2001)



















NASA’s Hubble Celebrates 21st Anniversary with “Rose” of Galaxies (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

NASA’s Hubble Celebrates 21st Anniversary with “Rose” of Galaxies (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)



















Pelican Nebula (by astrorom)

Pelican Nebula (by astrorom)



















A Galactic Spectacle (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

A Galactic Spectacle (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)



















Rosette Nebula “Narrow Band” (by John Castillo)

Rosette Nebula “Narrow Band” (by John Castillo)



















This mosaic image of the magnificent starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82) is the sharpest wide-angle view ever obtained of M82. It is a galaxy remarkable for its webs of shredded clouds and flame-like plumes of glowing hydrogen blasting out from its central regions where young stars are being born 10 times faster than they are inside in our Milky Way Galaxy. Also known as the Cigar Galaxy, M82 lies over 11 million light years away from Earth. (NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA) # (via The Big Picture)

This mosaic image of the magnificent starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82) is the sharpest wide-angle view ever obtained of M82. It is a galaxy remarkable for its webs of shredded clouds and flame-like plumes of glowing hydrogen blasting out from its central regions where young stars are being born 10 times faster than they are inside in our Milky Way Galaxy. Also known as the Cigar Galaxy, M82 lies over 11 million light years away from Earth. (NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA) # (via The Big Picture)



















Rosette, NGC2244 with NB filters 11h20 exposure (by Trois_Merlettes)

Rosette, NGC2244 with NB filters 11h20 exposure (by Trois_Merlettes)



















January 5, 2010—A new portrait of the Small  Magellanic Cloud reveals our galactic neighbor in unprecedented detail.  The picture, taken in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, is helping astronomers better understand the life cycle of dust in the galaxy.
Understanding where dust comes from, how it forms bodies such as  planets, and how it gets dispersed in the spaces between objects can  result in new insights into galaxy formation. And the Small Magellanic  Cloud, a dwarf galaxy close to the Milky Way, is an analog for some of  the tiny galaxies that first populated the universe.

January 5, 2010—A new portrait of the Small Magellanic Cloud reveals our galactic neighbor in unprecedented detail. The picture, taken in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, is helping astronomers better understand the life cycle of dust in the galaxy.

Understanding where dust comes from, how it forms bodies such as planets, and how it gets dispersed in the spaces between objects can result in new insights into galaxy formation. And the Small Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy close to the Milky Way, is an analog for some of the tiny galaxies that first populated the universe.